Scenes Of A 10K: An Accounting Of The Toronto Yonge Street 10K

<Open onto the interior of a well-lit studio apartment. The balcony door hangs ajar. A gentle spring breeze freshens the air. Our hero sits comfortably in a 1920’s wingback chair. A plate of cookies by his side. He faces the viewer.>

It was a good race I must say. Blustery and cold though. But still a very good race indeed. Not a personal best (PB) mind, but there will be other chances. Of that I’m quite certain.

I ran well today. My speed over the 2nd 5 kilometres eclipsing not only that of the first 5 kilometres but also my own PB for the 5k.

I never panicked. Which in previous 10k races I’ve fallen victim to rather readily. No, this time I ran with comfortable aggression. No one kilometre was particularly outstanding yet no one kilometre was notably weak either. At least by my own modest standards. And this allowed me to feel strong throughout today’s race. Strong enough to finish faster than I had started and strong enough to run another 10 kilometres to cool off after the race and to keep myself honed for the marathon in 2 weeks.

Yes. It was indeed a good day.

<His soliloquy done. Our hero breaks eye contact with his viewer. His attention has wandered to the plate of cookies at his side. Greedily he takes a bite.Β End scene.>

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12 comments

  1. my26pointtwo · · Reply

    It seems like you ran a very considered race, PB’s are sometimes less important than the incremental gains. Good luck with the upcoming marathon!

    1. Thanks Lewis. As you mentioned in your post, I wanted to leave the race feeling good, not leave minus a lung. Especially as the marathon overlaps somewhat with today’s race. So I’m really happy that I can take a lot of positive into my next race πŸ˜ƒ

  2. 1920’s wingtip chair, you’ve hit our sweet spot. Our house is Art Deco/Contemporary with an Asian splash. Great run seems like you really enjoyed it πŸ™‚

    1. Thanks Bill! I did enjoy it! I’m really happy with how the race went and just as importantly how this sets me up for the marathon.

  3. Sounds like a great day. Well done?

  4. OK, I have to ask. Any visions of Boston Qualifying dancing in your head this season? You worked hard during the off season and it looks like it is paying off…

    1. Thanks Raymond. I’m feeling really good. But I honestly don’t even know what the qualifying time is ☺️

      I will admit to plugging in my 10km time into several marathon time predictors to see what they say.

      The predictions didn’t work out 3 years ago as I crashed in the latter stages of the marathon, despite scoring my PB. But I am stronger now. I am more skilled at pacing now. I just need to prove it.

      Now.

      1. I think you are M40-44. That would be a 3:15 marathon to apply (you would need a few minutes buffer to get in) if the times haven’t changed since I last looked. When you hit 45, the time gets easier (3:25). The calculators have been pretty accurate for me across the shorter distances, but I fall apart at the marathon. I should be running a 3:40-3:45 marathon (so a 3:25 should be attainable), but I am stuck at 4:26.

        You will earn your ticket to Boston at some point I am sure. I think the qualifying times are quite stiff for male runners…

  5. Oops! That was meant to be an exclamation mark, not a question mark at the end!!!

    1. Thanks Kristi! I felt really good out there and am really happy with my pacing.

      How did orienteering go?

  6. It really would be a good feeling to finish stronger than you started. Well done with the extra 10k.
    With the 10k I did In Barrie that morning, the winds really got strong. It was quite calm earlier in the morning and quite pleasant. Once the wind picked up, it was cold. I imagine you had the same wind in Toronto.
    All the best in next weekend’s Toronto marathon. πŸ™‚
    ~Carl~

    1. Thanks Carl! Yes it certainly was gusty that morning. And the wind tended to swirl a bit too. So sometimes the wind was my friend and sometimes it was my arch enemy πŸ˜‰

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